Archive for the art Category

NIGHT TO DAWN MAGAZINE ISSUE 23

Posted in art, Australia, Barbara Custer, horror writer, mythology, Night to Dawn, Night to Dawn author, Published in the USA, pulp fiction writer, set in Australia, Uncategorized, USA, Vampire author with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on March 3, 2013 by ROD MARSDEN

NTD23frontcover-229x300
Nice colour scheme on the front cover art.

 

Of the interior art, David L. Transue’s noble knight on page 22 is well done. Marg Simon’s sketch on page 58 reminds me of the great Gene Colan back in his Tomb of Dracula days.

Of the stories Todd Hank’s one-pager Vampire Ferris Wheel comes with a nice twist to the tale.

A Road Less Travelled by Hal Kempla has some nice atmospherics. Careful how you go about ‘seeing America.’ Careful what you take for innocent.

Oh and it was wonderful to see my Midnight Gunslinger in print. Kansas really was known as bloody Kansas back in the days just before the American Civil War broke out. Perfect locale for a gun toting vampire.

Of the poems, Twisted Nursery Rhymes by Lee Clark Zempe hit the spot. This fellow does have a dark sense of humour.

I wonder if issue 25 will be a silver issue with a silver cover and silver stories inside.

Meanwhile I’ll look forward to issue 24 and what it has to offer. 

 

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NIGHT TO DAWN

Posted in art, Australia, Barbara Custer, dark fiction writer, desk job, Egypt, horror writer, Lewis Carroll enthusiast, Lyn McConchie's friend, mythology, Night to Dawn, Night to Dawn author, Published in the USA, pulp fiction writer, Romance, Teresa Tunaley, Tom Johnson, Uncategorized, USA, Vampire author, Writer with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 21, 2012 by ROD MARSDEN

Night to Dawn is a semi-annual horror magazine put out by Barbara Custer. She goes to some effort to get the best stories, poetry and artwork from around the world. Though an American publication, it often contains stories from as far afield as Australia.

Starting out as primarily a vampire magazine, Night to Dawn has spread its black wings of late into other areas of horror. Tales dealing with zombies, ancient gods, and the Egyptian dead are now most welcome. Egyptian horror has, in fact, appeared in issues 21 and 22. As for what kind of story fits into the magazine, there’s everything from your classic romantic undead piece to a salute to Joe R. Lansdale’s Dead in the West.

Since 22 is the latest issue (It is dated October 2012 but I have an advance copy), I’ll pick out my favorite stories, poetry and illustrations within to give you an idea of the quality of Night to Dawn magazine.

The front cover to 22 is an eye catching red and gold. The illustration by Marge Simon appears to be reminiscent of the Roman era and puts me in mind of a female Roman vampire story I read ages ago. The back cover by Teresa Tunaley shows a female vampire with blood on her lips. The way her eye lids are painted, she might be off to some mardi gras celebration somewhere in the world.

In the editor’s section we learn about the latest round of books being published by Night to Dawn. They include Desk Job by Rod Marsden, City of Brotherly Death by Barbara Custer, and Tom Johnson and James Reasoner’s Jur: A Story of Pre Dawn Earth.

Of the interior illustrations, I am drawn to the third eye effort by David Transue (page 14), the all teeth and eyes freak out by Denny E. Marshall (page 32), and the zombied out mardi gras spectacular by Chris Friend (page 40).

In poetry there’s Tod Hanks’ splendid though traditional take on the vampire, Concubines of the Vampire (pages 6 and 7), Fatale by Cathy Bryant (page 14) which has a nice, bouncy rhythm, and Christmas Eve by Chris Friend (page 39) which is a delightful bit of fun with the spirits of the dead.

Of the tales I liked Rajeev Bhargava’s Mirror, Mirror on my Cellar Wall best. Here we have a touch of Greek mythology with a modern take on a particularly monstrous legend.

Coming up a close second is The Harlots of New Chapel Row by a writer going by the name Horns. It is a to be continued tale of bloody intrigue where lust and keeping up with your mates already goes terribly wrong.

A very close third is The Triangle by Derek Muk which hauls out the Bermuda Triangle for inspection. The suspense builds up in this one making it well worth the read.

For more information on Night to Dawn magazine and books check out these sites:

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THE CAT’S MEOW! From Egypt to England to an Australian DESK JOB

Posted in art, dark fiction writer, Lewis Carroll enthusiast, Lyn McConchie's friend, Night to Dawn author, Writer with tags , , , , , on June 24, 2012 by ROD MARSDEN

SMILEY CAT

The Cat’s Meow! The Cat’s whiskers! The Cat’s pajamas! These are good British expressions that tend to put a smile on the dial of certain readers and, at the same time, conjure up pleasant if somewhat unusual images.

The there’s the childhood story of the kitten who lost his mitten that no doubt came out of some golden book edition. Nowadays, thanks to the Americans, the puss in boots is a rather dashing expert with the foil. In the hit television show The Big Bang Theory we have a song about a soft kitty who is warm. In the hit television show The Simpsons we have cats going through their nine lives rather quickly.

A cat once wanted to visit the Queen of England while yet another fur ball was happy to curl up on a mat near the fireplace.

In the USA there was a cartoon tom by the name of Sylvester who, on numerous occasions, mistook a kangaroo for an extraordinarily large bouncing mouse and there have been quite a few American felines, in fiction and real life, who have inherited great fortunes.

Some years ago I was asked to write some stories for an anthology titled: Cats Do it Better. One of the stories I wrote for this American book dealt with a cat that was an old salt and had the run of the ship he was on. Why was the cat an old salt? Well, many a sailing vessel in the old days did have a cat on board as a mascot. It wasn’t just a matter of companionship for the crew. A cat had a practical use. If you want to keep mice and rats out of the scullery and thus out of the sailor’s food they are the natural and also the most economical way of doing so. In fact, our long standing relationship with felines probably began when it was discovered that they could be of use in protecting the harvest.

In ancient Egypt, no doubt because of the importance of the grain, cats were at one time worshiped. No grain, no bread and the end result of that, of course, is starvation. Hence a small, usually furry, creature that can keep the vermin at bay and thus keep the grain safe has to be considered. at the very least, as asset worth keeping around. I say here usually furry because there is a hairless type of Egyptian cat. The hairless Egyptian, in fact, was in one of the Austin Powers movies as a regular cat who had supposedly lost his fur after being frozen then thawed out. In any event, the hairless Egyptian is ideal for the cat lover who happens to be allergic to cat hair.

Black cats for some time have been associated with witches and witchcraft. The idea that a black cat crossing one’s path will bring trouble is a very old superstition. The word catastrophe has cat in it.

Even so, a lot of nice things over the years have been written about cats and writers, such as New Zealand novelist and researcher Lyn McConchie, have been responsible. Her cat Thunder is amazing but, then again, many of the other animals on her farm are most unusual as her book Farming Daze would tend to point out.

Of late I have been examining the two Alice books by 19th Century British writer Lewis Carroll. They are not without cats. The best noted cat in them, of course, hails from Cheshire. Among other things, he has a great big grin and a marvelous disappearing act. He is also rather mysterious and cheeky. Naturally, when I decided to write my salute to Carroll a Cheshire like cat or two was definitely called for. I would not want readers to feel they were short changed in any way. Besides, my niece, Aila, has a new pet cat and that was also a pretty good reason to sneak at least one fur ball into the book.

In my novel, Desk Job, There are four felines that fit the bill. Two have fur coats and the other two seem to get along quite nicely without them even though neither happens to be Egyptian. In any event, a certain fictional office in Sydney, Australia would not be complete without at least one tail to balance out the overall tale.

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RATS! By ROD MARSDEN

Posted in art, Australia, Barbara Custer, dark fiction writer, desk job, horror writer, Lewis Carroll enthusiast, Lyn McConchie's friend, mythology, Night to Dawn, Night to Dawn author, pulp fiction writer, set in Australia, Sex, Vampire author, Writer with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on November 25, 2009 by ROD MARSDEN
Madness

MADNESS IN MUSIC

 

 

RATS!

Two men sitting on a park bench, Ken and Ian. Both are ratty looking with long scraggly hair and grimy clothes.

Ken: “I tell ya, mate. With inflation and devaluation of the dollar the rats are gonna take over.”

Ian: “No!”

Ken: “They really are gonna take over! They’ve been planning it for decades. Decades, I tell ya! Look! First there was rock-an’-roll – the devil’s music. Then it got heavy! It began to bruise the minds of its listeners.”

Ian: “Yeah?”

Ken: “Ever heard of a group called Deep Purple? What do you think the Rolling Stones’ ‘Black and Blue over You’ was all about? I tell you it was diabolical.”

Ian: “Diabolical you say?”

Ken: “Then came Punk, in protest. But it didn’t work! Then came New Wave, also in protest, but that didn’t work, either. I guess Madonna was just too much. You see, she used the ultimate weapon. Something we had no way of shielding ourselves against.”

Ian: “What was it?”

Ken: “Sex. Oh, the fiend! And she played the appealing innocent so well until she whipped off her disguise to wildly applauding fans. And now…?”

Ian: “Now what?”

Ken: “No one’s protesting anymore, Mate. Its too late for that. Back in the ‘60s they – the evil ones – used to pick guitar with their fingers. Now they pick with other people’s digits and… their teeth!”

A hoard of rats swarm into the park.

Ian: “You irritate me with your hysteria.”

Ken cries out in surprise mixed with anguish as he is attacked by thousands of rats who are, for the moment, not at all interested in Ian.

Ian: “And stop screaming at me. If you’ve got something to say, say it.”

The rats, all of them, wander away leaving Ken a skeleton sitting next to Ian.

Ian: “And, Ken, you can take that silly grin off your face.”

THE END

WALKING LIKE AN EGYPTIAN IN SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA, ENGLAND, FRANCE, AND EGYPT

Posted in art, Art Deco, Australia, Cleopatra's needle, dark fiction writer, Egypt, France, Lewis Carroll enthusiast, London, Lyn McConchie's friend, mythology, New York, Night to Dawn author, Published in the USA, set in Australia, Set in italy, USA, Writer with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 14, 2009 by ROD MARSDEN
Evil in the night...

THE MYSTERIES OF ANCIENT EGYPT

When artifacts from Ancient Egypt turn up at at major city in Australia, such as Melbourne, Sydney or Canberra there is always great excitement. It seems as if there has always been a lot of interest in things ancient and Egyptian.

Ancient Greek travelers made a fuss about Egypt describing it as a place of wonders. They were right on the mark. Then, some time later, the Romans came along and were impressed by what they saw. They also took home with them artifacts they felt said something about power and majesty.

For a while Egypt was the bread basket of the Roman Empire. This was so to the extent that if there was a famine in Egypt or the grain ships from Egypt would not sail, then there would be starvation in Rome.

Today, in Rome, there are still ancient Egyptian artifacts on display that are left over from the Roman Empire days.

Ancient Egypt appears in the Bible and hence has that connection with at least the Christians of the western world. Then there is the alchemy connection and also what Hollywood studios and British studios have made, since the 1930’s, of the possibilities of walking mummies. The notion of ancient evil rising to attack the present world has been the bread and butter of many a writer including American pulp genius of the haunting,  H. P. Lovecraft.

Everyone loves a good mystery and fiction writers adore a great locale for their fiction. Agatha Christie, for example, made much of Egypt as a backdrop for her murder mystery, Death on the Nile (1937).

The present day fascination with Ancient Egypt really began with Napoleon and his scholars wandering through what was then modern Egypt in the 18th and early 19th Century (1788-1801). British warships made the complete conquest of Egypt by the French impossible. In face Napoleon was lucky to get out of Egypt without getting captured by the British. Even so, some spin had to be put on the Egyptian campaign in order to save face but how to go about doing so was the big question. What the campaign lacked in military value it could, to some extent, make up for in scientific and historic value. Hence the craze to know and understand Ancient Egypt swept France in a way it had never done before.

Note here that Napoleon adopted the symbol of the bee, thinking it was an Egyptian symbol for power. Later it was discovered that it was actually a symbol for one of the two Egyptian kingdoms.

The main treasure of the French Egyptian campaign, the Rosetta stone, fell into the hands of the British and still rests in a museum in London. Even so, this clue as to how to read Egyptian  Hieroglyphics first came into French possession after many centuries of  either being buried or ignored by the locals, and it was the French who first took the necessary 19th Century steps in figuring out the ancient writings that had puzzled visitors to Egypt for centuries. The British, Germans and Italians took their best shots at working out the meaning of Egyptian Hieroglyphics but it was a Frenchman by the name of Jean-Francois Champollion who eventually succeeded. Also thanks to Champollion and his predecessors, the Louvre in Paris has a fantastic Egyptian wing.

Both the French and the British went wild  for things Egyptian in the 19th Century much the way the Romans had gone wild for things Egyptian in earlier centuries. The British moved the obelisk known to them as Cleopatra’s needle from Egypt to London. Not to be out done by the British, the French also moved an obelisk they thought of as Cleopatra’s needle from Egypt to Paris. Then there is the obelisk known as Cleopatra’s needle which was moved from Egypt to New York also in the 19th Century.

Incidentally,  the London obelisk was falsely named Cleopatra’s needle but still stands as an incredibly old and powerful symbol of what the Ancient Egyptians were capable of doing. Moving these giant obelisks without smashing them up was and is considered some feat by the engineers who did so in the 19th Century.

Meanwhile Australia wasn’t to be completely left out when it came to obelisks. At the entrance to Hyde Park in Sydney (intersection of Elizabeth St and Bathurst Street) there stands a most unusual but still impressive obelisk. It was modeled on the obelisk the British took to London but the materials used in construction are very much 19th Century and of the country where it was made rather than of ancient Egypt. It is primarily made of sandstone with a bronze pyramid on top.  It is also adorned by sphinxes and serpents. It was meant to serve as a sewage vent to eliminate noxious gases from the sewer underneath though it has never fulfilled this function very well.  It was first unveiled to the public in 1857 and today it is in need of some maintenance. Even so, it is still a magnificent sight and well worth checking out if you are visiting Sydney.

In 1922 the discovery of the burial place of Pharaoh Tutankhamun in Egypt caused a great stir of excitement and new interest in Ancient Egypt. Among the treasures found there was a magnificent golden mask.  The discovery coincided with the art deco movement which began in Paris in the 1920s and spread out from there. Ancient Egyptian symbolism and hieroglyphics tended to go well with this new art form. Pyramid designs became popular everywhere as did the ankh which appears in Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics but also on its own as the symbol of life. It remains today a popular symbol worn by many people throughout the world.

Today, outside the Louvre in Paris, there is a rather strange and controversial glass pyramid.  It was completed in 1989 proving that even toward the end of  the 20th Century interest in Ancient Egypt remained solid at least with the French. In Dan Brown’s 2003 novel, The Da Vinci Code,  you will find more than passing mention of this glass edifice.

Every now and then the subject of pyramid power arises. Does the very shape of the pyramid evoke forces we have yet to fully understand? Can even sitting under a makeshift pyramid meditating lead to better health? In A Country Practice, an Australian television soap set in a country town in the 1980s, a doctor’s receptionist, Shirley Gilroy (as played by Lorrae Desmond), believed in the healing powers of the pyramid. It was a sort of running joke with always the possibility that it might indeed be true. Mind you, as far as I am concerned, the major benefit, if the is one, to sitting under a makeshift pyramid is the belief factor that it will do you some good.

In 1986, just to prove that there was still some excitement to be generated by anything even remotely to do with Ancient Egypt, the band The Bangles had a hit with the song, Walk like an Egyptian. It was a silly, fun bit of business with none of the American girl members of the band coming anywhere close to looking and, for that matter, actually dancing like what an egyptologist might envision how ancient Egyptians dance. Here, of course, the operative word is fun and it is obvious there was no desire to even attempt to get it, let along keep it, real. Sometimes you need to let people have their fantasies and their fun.

In 2011 one of my nieces came back from Egypt and presented me with a small glass pyramid from Egypt. It doesn’t date back to ancient times but I do feel good when I look at it. I think this has more to it being a treasured gift than anything else. Mind you it would really be something if it did, in fact, have mystical powers of healing and promoting good health. Well, this particular niece used to walk like an Egyptian before visiting Egypt and, at times, she still walks like an Egyptian.

Among present day Australians with an interest in ancient Egypt there is television personality Molly Meldrum.  In recent times Molly has shown enthusiasm for Pharaoh Tutankhamun’s story plus the golden age of Pharaohs.

As for ancient evil, this is really something that belongs in western fiction beginning in the 1920s and continuing to this day. It started with the belief in the mummy’s curse attributed to disturbing Tutankhamun’s resting place and went from there. Mind you, the old gods of Egypt are rather fierce and not to be casually mucked about with.

The symbol of Life – Egyptian style!

THE OFFICE CONTINUES TO BE A MOST CURIOUS PLACE!

Posted in art, Australia, Butterflies, desk job, Lewis Carroll enthusiast, Lyn McConchie's friend, Moths, mythology, Night to Dawn, Night to Dawn author, Published in the USA, set in Australia, USA, Writer with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on September 21, 2009 by ROD MARSDEN
CREATURES OF THE NIGHT!

THERE ARE STILL WARRIOR WOMEN AND PRAYING MANTISES AROUND!

The office, indeed, continues to be a most curious place. In the first decade of the 21st Century computers have grown up. The screens are less bulky than they were in the mid-1990s. In some offices access to the internet is essential for up to date reasearch.

Whether an office worker has much of a life while alive in this first decade remains debatable. In some offices in the USA coffee breaks and toilet breaks came to be clocked and in other wats monitored. Any worker spending too much time with one or the other could either get demoted or sacked. Medical conditions, of course, were taken into consideration. Clocking office workers in this way by management in Australia was considered but generally rejected as a practice.

Back in the first ten years of the 21st Century there were call centers operating in New South Wales, Australia. Much of this work has moved overseas to places such as India and Pakistan. where they can be run more cheaply. By this period of time not much remained of the clothing manufacturing industry that showed so much promise in the late 1960s and early ’70s. Once it was the wool trade that kept the country economically viable. Today, in 2012, it is mining. This trend toward mining becoming so very important was noticeable in the early years of the 21st Century. Now, more than a decade after 2001, it looks like the mining boom is petering out. I cannot say what it will be replaced by if it peters out too much but it will then have to be replaced by something.

Today, in too many offices in major cities, there are still praying mantises doing their thing along with butterflies and moths. In too many work venues, including banking, there are caterpillars puffing away on their water pipes. In the better run establishments, of course, hawks run the business without the necessity of a caterpillar. Oh and you will occasionally meet a warrior woman with some substance along with a dung beetle of no substance whatsoever and that rareset of all creatures, a mule with wings.

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THE 20th AND 21st CENTURY VAMPIRE!

Posted in art, Australia, Barbara Custer, dark fiction writer, desk job, horror writer, Lewis Carroll enthusiast, Marvel Comics, mythology, Night to Dawn, Night to Dawn author, Published in the USA, pulp fiction writer, Romance, Sex, United Kingdom, USA, Vampire author, Writer with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 21, 2009 by ROD MARSDEN
VAMPYRE

VAMPYRE

Television in the late 20th and early 21st Centuries has been a good source of vampire action. In the British television show Doctor Who there have been a number of exceptionally enjoyable outings with the fanged ones. The First Doctor, William Hartnell, came across a mechanical Count Dracula in an amusement park while being chased by Daleks. The mechanical Count Dracula with his buddy, a mechanical Frankenstein monster, actually aided the Doctor and his companions. The Daleks wouldn’t be scared and they wouldn’t play nice so they got knocked about.

The fourth Doctor, Tom Baker, ran into a nest of vampire like aliens on an alien space ship that had seen better days.

In Sylvester McCoy’s time as The Doctor, there was terror during the 2nd Wortld War in a small British village. Ace was there as his companions and, once again, it was an alien presence with fangs to sp;are.. Faith was the main weapon used against these particular crreatures. What you had faith in didn’t seem to matter though without it you were likely to end up dead.

One of the earlier adventures of the present day Doctor, Matt Smith, which was set in 16th Century Venice, had outer space vampires infecting humans to transform them into blood suckers.

Apart from Docror Who, there have been a number of horror shows, such as Night Stalker, that occasionally have an episode with vampires in it.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer, when it came out in the 1990s, changed the way many viewers and writers think about the undead. Only one vampire, Dracula, ever appeared in this show as the type of male blood drinker reminiscent of the late 19th Century type and the type favoured by the Universal movie makers in the 1930s and ’40s. There was one female vampire, Drusilla, who sometimes dressed as if she belonged to the Victorian age but this was understandable since she had not only been around for a while but was positively insane. Sure, Drusilla, as played by Juliet Landau, was attractive but you could never really tell how the cogs in her head were turning at any one time. She could be playful and cruel and even a little pathetic all at the same time.  Spike, who was her vampire boyfriend for a time, tended to dress very punkish and contemporary despite how long he’d acrtually been around. His eventual falling in love with the slayer made for moments of humor as well as pathos in the show.

A spin off to Buffy was Angel which didn’t quite work as well. Here was a show about a male vampire with his soul returned to him. Angel, as played by David Boreanaz didn’t quite work for me. I prefer Boreanaz as an actor in the television show Bones. Even so, Angel was successful though not as successful as the show it had spun off from. Charisma Carpenter, as the flip and trendoid Cordelia Chase, did a lot to make both Buffy and Angel work as well as they did.  Sarah Michelle Gellar played Buffy very well.

Sanctuary, a Canadian science fiction/fantasy extravaganza, started in 2007. Starring Amanda Tapping, it is about a place and the people dedicated to preserving the strange and the odd from humanity and also, at given times, protecting humanity from the strange and the odd. There are a number of vampires and vampire like creatures in the show.

Being Human started out as a quirky British television show where a werewolf, a vampire and a ghost set up house and try to live as ‘normal’ as life as they possibly can. Of course outside forces will not allow this to happen. The show kicked off in 2008. There is now also an American version.

There have been numerous paperback books dedicated to the Doctor Who television series involving the undead as well as novels dedicated to the  Buffy television series.

Since the 1980s, Terry Pratchett with his Discworld series has been playing merry hell with the vampire. In The Truth (2000) for example he has a vampire photographer keen on photography but also a bit of a masochist. Every time he uses a flash he screams and goes to dust and has to be brought back with droplets of blood. In his novel Monstrous Regiment (2003) there is a vampire who has taken the pledge stay off the blood (he’s an official black ribboner) but because of this has a mad obsession when it comes to coffee. Oh, and as the story develops we discover that this vampire isn’t a he at all but a she. In Monstrous Regiment there are, in fact, a lot of shes masquerading as hes. It makes for a very strange and funny read.

In 2003 Twilight Healer by Barbara Custer came out and gained some market appeal. It dealt with the vampire and also the ailing hospital system in the USA.

In recent years the novel Twilight by Stephanie Myer (2005)  has brought the vampire novel alive for teenage girl readers.

Now let us go back in time and see how the 19th Century writers left their mark on our views of horror and also how the latter 20th Century writers and fiulm makers also left their mark.

The 19th Century ended at a time when new technology was coming in to make life more exciting. The novel was doing very well. Stage plays dealing with horror had their place in society. Dracula by Bram Stoker, for instance, had gone from novel to play without much difficulty. Stoker was, in fact, well aquainted with theatrical life and knew how to promote his vampire as a stage phenomenon. The idea of having nurses in attendance, for example, for women in the audience  who might get over excited during a performance and faint was a stroke of genius. Of course nothing like this actually did happen but the result of having the nurses there was curious women packing into the theatre every night.

I picked up this bit of information about the nurses from a pamphlet I read while watching an Australian stage play production of Dracula way back in the 1970s. The very idea stuck with me because of not only the absurdity value but also the blatant showmanship of the thing.  Stoker did write short stories dealing with other vampires but he will best be remembered for Dracula.

Moving pictures were just starting up in the late 19th Century but had become a real and powerful though silent art form in the first couple of decades into the 20th Century. The Germans flirted outrageously with horror. Their use of shadow in what was then basically a black and white era of cinematography was extraordinary. In fact American horror cinematography in the 1930s that had to be more suggestive because of censorship restrictions, owed a lot of its atmospherics to the German trail blazers.

Early vampire films include: The Vampire’s Trail (1910), Saved from the Vampire (1914), A Night of Horror (German classic 1916) and Drakula (1921).

Nosferatu (1922) was a German cinematic masterpiece than ran afoul of the by then late Bram Stoker’s estate for copyright violations. Even so, it rates high today as a triumph of early cinema nastiness. Unlike Dracula, the vampire Nosferatu is far from handsome with a bald, rat like face. Instread of being killed by a stake he neglects the time due to the beauty of his would be victim and thus the rays of the rising sun give him his second and perhaps final death.

The 1931 Dracula had sound as well as what was for the time great special effects. It  came after the play Dracula’s recent and  successful run in the USA. Believe it or not, back then Bela Lugosi was considered by many female horror fans to be a sex symbol of the dark, forboding but still fun kind. Women wanted to be seduced by him.

Meanwhile unsuccessful attempts were made to put the female vampire onto the backburner. There was a scene filmed in the 1931 Dracula movie where you did have three rather attractive female vampires vamping it up but the censorship boys did the snip! snip! and we only have the stills and the original script to give us some indication of what this scene was like.

There were Vamps (dark, mysterious females with an edge) in the silent films and in the photographs that made photographer Manray famous but the beginning of the talkies  era was no place for females with fangs.

The silent film A Fool There Was (1915) has Theda Bara as a predatory but charming Vamp with a whip.

Vampyr (loosely based on Carmilla, a 1872 novella  by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu) was cinematically released in 1932. It had  a charming female blood-sucker in the lead role. Dracula’s Daughter, a film based on one of Stoker’s short stories, came out in 1936.

In the 1939 novel, Goodbye to Berlin by Christopher Isherwood, there are female as well as male Cabaret singers and dancers poking fun at life in Germany in the 1930s but also vamping up the night. The film Caberet (1966) is roughly based on this book.

With the end of World War Two and the coming of the atomic age, the vampire took a curious turn. Could radiation produce vampires? Could vampires come from outer space?

In the 1950s there were a number of films dedicated to the outerspace bloodsucker including: The Thing From Another World (1951) and Not of This Earth (1957).

In some ways Richard Matheson’s 1954 science fiction novel, I am Legend, is as much about the futuristic vampire as it is about the futuristic zombie.

In 1976 British science fiction writer Colin Wilson’s The Space Vampires saw print. These, however, are energy leeching creatures rather than blood-suckers. Even so, they should not have been brought back from outer space to menace humankind. Astronauts need to be careful what they bring with them to earth. In 1985 the book was made into a rather mediocre film, Lifeforce.

Not all vampire movies can be taken seriously as horror and, in some cases, we know the intention drifted more toward horror comedy. Good examples of these type of films include: Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (1948),  Billy the Kid vs. Dracula (1966), Dracula Meets the Outer Space Chicks (1967), and Blackula (1972).

Of the horror novelists of the 20th and 21st centuries Stephen King’s approach to the undead is somewhat unique. Salem’s Lot (1975), with its vivid descriptions of a small town in the USA gone mysteriously wrong, helped to revive the vampire for American readers.

Meanwhile in Great Britain Hammer was producing some of the best vampire films to be made in the 20th Century. These included: Horror of Dracula starring Christopher Lee (1958), Dracula, Prince of Darkness (1965), The Scars of Dracula (1970),  Lust for a Vampire (1970),  The Vampire Lovers (1970),  and Dracula A.D 1972 (1972). There was a fire which ripped through the Hammer studios and this, in part, ended the Hammer reign of visual terror. There was talk a few years ago about reviving Hammer but as far as I know nothing has come of it.

In the 1970s Marvel comics did well with its Tomb of Dracula series. The main illustrator was Gene Colan and the main writer was Marv Wolfman. An offshoot of this series are the successful Blade vampire slayer movies.

One of the better magazines to deal with vampires that has come out in the last decade or so is Night to Dawn. just about every issue has at least one vampire and, though it is an American magazine, both the writers and illustrators come from all over the globe. There are even one or two Australian writers.

http://bloodredshadow.com/about/night-to-dawn-magazine-and-books/

Vampiric  books from Night to Dawn include:  Trilogy of the Dead (2012) and City of Brotherly Death (2012), both by Barbarta Custer.

In the Night to Dawn range there is Undead Reb Down under Tales (2009), Disco Evil (2009) and Ghost Dance (2010) by Rod Marsden.

http://bloodredshadow.com/about/night-to-dawn-magazine-and-books/rod-marsden-supernatural-thriller-vampire-lore/ghost-dance-excerpt-reviews/

My latest novel, Desk Job, is a salute to Lewis Carroll and, strictly speaking, doesn’t have vampires running around within its pages. It does, however, have humanoid praying mantises that are rather nasty.

http://bloodredshadow.com/about/night-to-dawn-magazine-and-books/rod-marsden-supernatural-thriller-vampire-lore/desk-job/