Archive for Great Britain

TO WALK LIKE A LIKA-LIKA BIRD

Posted in Australia, Barbara Custer, birds, dark fiction writer, desk job, Great Britain, Lewis Carroll enthusiast, Lyn McConchie's friend, mythology, Night to Dawn, Night to Dawn author, Published in the USA, set in Australia, United Kingdom, USA, Writer with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on July 3, 2012 by ROD MARSDEN

THE LIKA- LIKA BIRD

Today the lika-lika bird is the new, improved ‘bush telegraph’.

If you want your local news but not from the tele then have a chat with your nearest lika-lika. Of an afternoon, on a work day, you will find her at the mall. On weekends in summer you will find her at the beach.

If you want to spread the word about something then take a lika-lika into your confidence. She’s sure to find the best way to get your message out there. Of course there are some naughty lika-likas that go in for graffiti. Sometimes their feathers are ruffled by the law.

Today there are former lika-likas in news print, radio and, yes, television. They are also in advertising.

Lika-lika birds can be found in Australia, the USA, Great Britain, Japan, China and lots more locales. They tend to get around. They like to have fun in the sun and hang out with mall rats and surfers. Freedom and gossip are their meat and bread.

For more information on this rather active flapper check out Desk Job.

http://bloodredshadow.com/about/night-to-dawn-magazine-and-books/rod-marsden-supernatural-thriller-vampire-lore/desk-job/

THE OWL AS A MESSENGER AND GUARDIAN

Posted in Australia, Barbara Custer, dark fiction writer, desk job, Great Britain, Lewis Carroll enthusiast, Lyn McConchie's friend, mythology, Night to Dawn, Night to Dawn author, Published in the USA, set in Australia, United Kingdom, USA, Writer with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 3, 2012 by ROD MARSDEN

EYES IN THE NIGHT

It is said that Athena, the goddess of  Athens, uses owls to keep tabs on the people of her favorite Greek city.

Owls have their place as mail birds in the Harry Potter novels and movies.

In the 1967 novel I Heard the Owl Call my Name by Margaret Craven, the owl doing so is making known that the listener who owns the name will soon pass away. It is set in a native Indian village in British Columbia.

I once went fishing with an owl. It was on a river bank at Iluka in northern New South Wales, Australia. He was a young white fellow. I didn’t mind the company and neither did my feathered friend for the evening. He was on a branch about ten feet away from me and I am glad to say he didn’t seem concerned at all being so close to a Human. It was a pleasant night for both of us.

In my novel, Desk Job, owls are there to guard and protect. The frog-mouthed variety guard and protect property. The white kind seek to accomplish the more difficult task of guarding the minds and the souls of the office workers. Owls sometimes appear in dreams with words of wisdom for those who will listen. North American Indian mythology has it that if an owl calls your name it has a special meaning and significance. It is a call to you from the great beyond.

http://bloodredshadow.com/about/night-to-dawn-magazine-and-books/rod-marsden-supernatural-thriller-vampire-lore/desk-job/

REVIEW OF DISCO EVIL: DEAD MAN’S STAND

Posted in Australia, Barbara Custer, dark fiction writer, desk job, Glasgow, Great Britain, horror writer, Knightswood, Lewis Carroll enthusiast, Lyn McConchie's friend, mythology, Neil K. Henderson, Night to Dawn, Night to Dawn author, Published in the USA, pulp fiction writer, Romance, Scotland, set in Australia, United Kingdom, USA, Vampire author, Writer with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 25, 2009 by ROD MARSDEN
Disco Evil

Disco Evil back cover art

Neil K. Henderson

Knightswood, Glasgow, Scotland, UK

6th Sept. 2009

Dear Rod,

Finally getting the chance to comment back on DISCO EVIL: DEAD MAN’S STAND…You have certainly taken an interesting angle on vampire culture, with not only the uncompromising contemporary setting, but the ‘moral code’ adhered to by your (anti-) hero. Indeed, the entire novel has a ‘both-sides-to-the-story’ aspect which leaves one finally unable to take sides. As in life, no one is either all good or all bad. You make this point repeatedly, and stress the need for mutual understanding and co-operation. This indeed comes to pass not only between the Secret Compass and Rising Sun Group, but with Muslim and non-Muslim Australians…

I must say I have thoroughly enjoyed being transported around the globe for a bat’s-eye view of human existence in recent times. I like the way you handled differing timescales, with life going on as normal in NSW, while Paul maintained eternal youth. The only fault I found with this was that it didn’t leave enough scope for in-depth vampire adventure on those travels. That’s an unavoidable problem, I suppose, since too much time spent with Paul would unbalance the structure of the novel. He did at least have some exciting near-misses with the forces of Life and Order. I have to say, I didn’t fancy his chances with those Maclean fellows one bit…

Anyway, I’ve had a ball reading your book. I found myself drawn into your fictional world and engaging with your characters in a way that says plenty for your descriptive skills. I hope you have a great success with it, and that it leads the way for many more.

All the best,

Neil

Neil k. Henderson is the author of a number of fictional works including MALDEHYDE’S DISCOMFITURE, or A LADY CHURNED (Pentagraph Press, Brighton, 1997), FISHWORSHIPPING – AS WE KNOW IT (Regent Books, Wolverhampton, 2001), AN ENGLISH SUMMER IN SCOTLAND AND OTHER UNLIKELY EVENTS (Skrev Press, 2005), and HORMONES A-GO-GO (Atlantean Publishing, 2009).