Archive for The Beatles

AN ENGLISH SUMMER IN SCOTLAND BY NEIL. K. HENDERSON

Posted in Australia, dark fiction writer, Glasgow, Great Britain, horror writer, Knightswood, Lewis Carroll enthusiast, mythology, Neil K. Henderson, Scotland, Writer with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 19, 2012 by ROD MARSDEN

A HOLE IN THE FLOOR

Neil K. Henderson’s An English Summer in Scotland and Other Unlikely Events does have more than its fair share of the unlikely and also the just plain demented. Each story takes you on a trip into Henderson’s imagination and it is some imagination.

 

It seems that no one can put meaning to butter and parsnips the way this wild Scot from Knightswood can. Also, no one can put together a dream girl, a birthday and a quiet time at home with a hole in the kitchen and creepy-crawlies doing their thing quite the same way. The hole is so deep it may reach all the way to Australia! What’s more, there’s a candle of all things shedding some light at the other end, making the hole even more of a wonder.

Colour explodes. There’s a kind of magical mystery tour going on amidst ancient grim even though no one is going anywhere fast except the crepy-crawlies. Then the scene changes.

Does Bunchie Nuttall get Ali Butterfield in the end? Does he even want her in the end?

Also, what’s with this dead, demented zombie cat? Is witchcraft afoot in Scotland or is it just the heat?

Can you have a quick draw thing happening in Scotland? Well, there is a Quick Draw at the Lazy B.  Laundrettes are places where apparently a mamn has to do what a man has to do.

Bath-time in Hell can be a bad scene especially when the number one bad guy turn up.  Again there are the creepy-crawlies to consider.

There are The Cat with the Inside-Out Head and The Cheesey Buscuit Goblin to make you wonder or at least push you in that direction.

Henerson’s style isn’t quite like fantasy writer Terry Pratchett but, then again, Terry Pratchett is English and loves his swords as well as his sorcery. Also in style Henderson is definitely more over the top and a dozen or so valleys away.

This book could be compared favourably with The Steam-driven Boy and Other Strangers (1973)  by Englishman John Stadek. Also An English Summer in Scotland is Henderson’s salute to british writer Lewis Carroll in that it has a mysterious hole, a girl like Alice in Ali and creatures best read about in the context of this fiction. Be warned though that this is experimental stuff. If you want further comparisons than try A Spaniard in the Works by John Lennon (1965).

An English Summer in Scotland and Other Unlikely Events by Neil K. Henderson was first published in 2005 by Skrev Press. For further information on grabbing a copy go to:

www. skrev-press.com

or write to:

Skrev Press

41 Manor Drive

Hebden Bridge

HX7 8DW

Scotland

UK

 

A VISUAL WRITER!

Posted in Australia, desk job, Great Britain, horror writer, Marvel Comics, Night to Dawn author, pulp fiction writer, set in Australia, United Kingdom, USA, Writer with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 21, 2009 by ROD MARSDEN
Black and white television

Television Science Fiction such as Doctor Who first appeared in black an white

I am very much a visual writer. Check out  http://bloodredshadow.com/about/night-to-dawn-magazine-and-books/rod-marsden-supernatural-thriller-vampire-lore/desk-job/

I grew up on Marvel Comics during the Silver Age of American Comic Books. This was the swinging sixties. It was the time when Britain rocked to the sounds of The Beatles and The Rolling Stones. It was the time when most guys under thirty had long hair or wanted to have long hair.

In the early sixties the main stream American comic books showed their loyalty to the USA by their support of the Vietnam War. It was a case of the democratic people of the world versus those dastardly commies. By the late sixties going into the ’70s, however, there had been a change. The USA was desperate for peace and the commies might not be so bad after all. The mainstream comic book companies had be led down a more moderate path by the fringe comics, the comic books not considered mainstream. They marked their difference from the mainstream by referring to themselves as comix rather than comic books.

Meanwhile there was the mini car together with the mini-skirt coming out of Britain. Women were definitely wearing the mini-skirts to  shopping and to the cinema in summer in Australia. They were also, more and more, wearing bikinis along Australian beaches. The German beetle was actually more popular in Australia then the mini because of its sturdiness and reliability.

Surfing took off big in the sixties. With it came an interest in places such as Bali and Hawaii that had beaches at least as good as the ones in Australia. Surf movies also took off.

My first car was a Morris 1500. It was old but faithful. It took me places. In thinking about what to call one of my cats in my novel Desk Job, the thought of this car came back to me and so the cat became Sir Morris.

One of the Australian programs of the time that used to make me smile was Skippy. It was about a bush kangaroo that could do amazing things. Of  course I knew straight off about the fantasy elements of the show (a kangaroo just doesn’t have paws suitable for untying rope) but that was half the fun. Another thing was that you got to see the Australian bush on your tele in color wrapped around a good adventure. Skippy also did well overseas.

Of the overseas television programs around I was most fond of Doctor Who (Britain) and Star Trek (USA). Strangely enough, I am still a big Doctor Who and Star Trek fan. Doctor Who started out in black and white and moved to color sometime in the ’70s with the third Doctor. Star Trek was always in color but I hadn’t noticed this at first since I was watching it on a black and white tele. My family only got a color tele in the mid ’70s.

Of the novels I have read over the last four or so decades the ones that impress me most have had either an historical, science fiction, or fantasy. Presently my all time favorite writer is Terry Pratchett who is very much a visual novelist.